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Goodbye Danube (eBook)

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  • 69,612 Words
  • 216 Pages

Benci, Irene, and their four children live in Budapest, Hungary. In the fall of 1956, they find themselves, along with the rest of the country, caught in a revolution that is ignited by young men and women. Fed up with a communist regime that has ruled since World War II, they march in protest, determined to rid their city of total control from a government with no conscience.Because Benci is a former soldier and a college professor, his life is threatened if he doesnt report for duty to fight his fellow citizens. Ignoring those orders, Benci and his family prepare to flee. Hundreds have already died in what started as peaceful demonstrations. A neighbors twelve-year-old son is killed for the crime of looking out a window. Their neighbors look to Benci for guidance. He is a man who is a world-champion fencer, which has earned him a celebrity status among his countrymen.Reluctantly, he takes on the challenge to lead about two dozen citizensmen, women, and children. Along the way, they face death several times and a frightening walk across a swaying bridge made of nothing more than planks and rope.Keeping the children safe and protected from the realities of their situation becomes the harshest, most emotional role Irene has ever played as a mother. Irenes entire world has always been devoted to her childrenMara, ten; Vera, eight; Andow, seven; and Gari, five. Now more than ever, they need her the most.Once they arrive safely in Austria, everyone rejoicesthat is, whoever is still alive. Of the two dozen who started out on this long journey, only fifteen remain. Irene cannot share the jubilations; she is heartbroken. Their freedom forced her to abandon her homeland and forsake her family, especially her mother, Gitta, who proclaimed that she was too old to make such a journey. My slowing you down could end in disaster for you and the children. No, its better that I stay here.The story continues until the children are young men and women. Because of Irenes fear of strangers due to years of not being able to trust anyone, she refuses to attend functions at Rutgers University, where Benci is employed. She will not allow a stranger to babysit her children, which leads to a bitter divorce; and Irene, though devastated, never accepts any responsibility for the failed marriage.

Benci, Irene, and their four children live in Budapest, Hungary. In the fall of 1956, they find themselves, along with the rest of the country, caught in a revolution that is ignited by young men and women. Fed up with a communist regime that has ruled since World War II, they march in protest, determined to rid their city of total control from a government with no conscience.Because Benci is a former soldier and a college professor, his life is threatened if he doesnt report for duty to fight his fellow citizens. Ignoring those orders, Benci and his family prepare to flee. Hundreds have already died in what started as peaceful demonstrations. A neighbors twelve-year-old son is killed for the crime of looking out a window. Their neighbors look to Benci for guidance. He is a man who is a world-champion fencer, which has earned him a celebrity status among his countrymen.Reluctantly, he takes on the challenge to lead about two dozen citizensmen, women, and children. Along the way, they face death several times and a frightening walk across a swaying bridge made of nothing more than planks and rope.Keeping the children safe and protected from the realities of their situation becomes the harshest, most emotional role Irene has ever played as a mother. Irenes entire world has always been devoted to her childrenMara, ten; Vera, eight; Andow, seven; and Gari, five. Now more than ever, they need her the most.Once they arrive safely in Austria, everyone rejoicesthat is, whoever is still alive. Of the two dozen who started out on this long journey, only fifteen remain. Irene cannot share the jubilations; she is heartbroken. Their freedom forced her to abandon her homeland and forsake her family, especially her mother, Gitta, who proclaimed that she was too old to make such a journey. My slowing you down could end in disaster for you and the children. No, its better that I stay here.The story continues until the children are young men and women. Because of Irenes fear of strangers due to years of not being able to trust anyone, she refuses to attend functions at Rutgers University, where Benci is employed. She will not allow a stranger to babysit her children, which leads to a bitter divorce; and Irene, though devastated, never accepts any responsibility for the failed marriage.


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