Default cover medium 7ea7b3aa26930478ced9ecae59763445d4b0afdb69433ac9bc5da51c744b554a

The Mexican Press and Civil Society, 1940–1976 (eBook)

by (Author)

  • 384 Pages

Mexico today is one of the most dangerous places in the world to report the news, and Mexicans have taken to the street to defend freedom of expression. As Benjamin T. Smith demonstrates in this history of the press and civil society, the cycle of violent repression and protest over journalism is nothing new. He traces it back to the growth in newspaper production and reading publics between 1940 and 1976, when a national thirst for tabloids, crime sheets, and magazines reached far beyond the middle class.

As Mexicans began to view local and national events through the prism of journalism, everyday politics changed radically. Even while lauding the liberty of the press, the state developed an arsenal of methods to control what was printed, including sophisticated spin and misdirection techniques, covert financial payments, and campaigns of threats, imprisonment, beatings, and even murder. The press was also pressured by media monopolists tacking between government demands and public expectations to maximize profits, and by coalitions of ordinary citizens demanding that local newspapers publicize stories of corruption, incompetence, and state violence. Since the Cold War, both in Mexico City and in the provinces, a robust radical journalism has posed challenges to government forces.

Mexico today is one of the most dangerous places in the world to report the news, and Mexicans have taken to the street to defend freedom of expression. As Benjamin T. Smith demonstrates in this history of the press and civil society, the cycle of violent repression and protest over journalism is nothing new. He traces it back to the growth in newspaper production and reading publics between 1940 and 1976, when a national thirst for tabloids, crime sheets, and magazines reached far beyond the middle class.

As Mexicans began to view local and national events through the prism of journalism, everyday politics changed radically. Even while lauding the liberty of the press, the state developed an arsenal of methods to control what was printed, including sophisticated spin and misdirection techniques, covert financial payments, and campaigns of threats, imprisonment, beatings, and even murder. The press was also pressured by media monopolists tacking between government demands and public expectations to maximize profits, and by coalitions of ordinary citizens demanding that local newspapers publicize stories of corruption, incompetence, and state violence. Since the Cold War, both in Mexico City and in the provinces, a robust radical journalism has posed challenges to government forces.



The Mexican Press and Civil Society, 1940–1976

No reviews were found. Please log in to write a review if you've read this book.

Item added to cart

Default cover bookshelf 2295447681a6cfd71a499fb97e31c5d46ec6e6fc4a223c60bfe81f610fd738e6
The Mexican Press and ...
$27.99
QTY: 1

Default cover bookshelf 2295447681a6cfd71a499fb97e31c5d46ec6e6fc4a223c60bfe81f610fd738e6

Write a Review for The Mexican Press and Civil Society, 1940–1976: Stories from the Newsroom, Stories from the Street

by benjamin t. smith

Average Rating:
×

The Mexican Press and Civil Society, 1940–1976 has been added

The Mexican Press and Civil Society, 1940–1976 has been added to your wish list.

Ok